Tag Archives: SDForum Cloud Services SIG

Oct. 26, 2010 SDF Membase NoSQL Cloud Solution

On October 26, 2010 in Menlo Park at Orrick, the SDForum Cloud Services SIG hosted Matt Ingenthron of Membase’s presentation “Scale out NoSQL Solution for the Cloud.”

Apps are moving from the desktop to the cloud, with millions of users expecting instantaneous response. Membase offers new techniques to store and retrieve data in the NoSQL space. They offer a simple, fast, elastic key-value database based on the memcached engine interface and compatible with existing memcached clients and applications. This is Open Source under an Apache 2.0 license and can scale in public or private clouds.

It was originally used to speed up access to authoritative data as a distributed hashtable. It can scale linearly by adding nodes without losing access to data and still maintain consistency when accessing. The scaling flattens out the cost and performance curves that would make traditional DBMS grind to a halt. This proved crucial when supporting such social games a Farmville and Mafia Wars. The Membase server database can handle 500,000 ops per second.

Ingenthron wrapped up by discussing Project Arcus, Moxi (memcached proxy), vBucket mapping, and clustering. He mentioned their partnership with Cloudera using Sqoop and Flume with Hadoop. Membase offers the distributed OLTP solution and Cloudera offers the distributed OLAP solution. As an example, an ad targeting to a particular user that might normally take 40 milliseconds could take only one millisecond. This could make a big difference when traveling across a crowded mobile network.

Copyright 2010 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Oct. 27, 2009 SDF Fed Cloud

SDF logo2009 copyChoi Soo copyEhret Steve copyGolden Bernard copyKapadia Amar copyKarnik Vikrant copyMcKenty Joshua copyStehle Carl copyVadakkepat Sree copyWeber Marty copy

On October 27, 2009 in Palo Alto at Tibco Software, the SDForum Cloud Services SIG presented “The Federal Government and Cloud Computing”. Bernard Golden, CEO of HyperStratus and Joshua McKenty, Technical Architect of NASA’s Nebula Project talked about the new federal commitment to cloud computing.

Bernard Golden recently spent a week in Washington, DC, meeting with Congressional Committee staff members and various Federal agencies to discuss their cloud computing initiatives and concerns. Bernard shared the status of the overall Federal cloud computing initiative, his recommendations to the groups he met with, and upcoming milestones and deliverables for the Federal cloud. He thinks Federal cloud computing efforts and commercial cloud ecosystem will integrate and both will benefit.

Golden spoke about Vivek Kundra, who became the first Federal CIO and is strongly committed to the cloud. When Kundra took over he found hundreds of data centers all over the country. He wanted not just structural efficiency but operational efficiency. On his first day he called a meeting and asked the attendees about cloud computing. When they first group said it couldn’t be done, Kundra fired them and called in the next group. Not surprisingly, they said it could be done.

Golden met with staff of congressional committee for the House Energy and Commerce. They are concerned about network neutrality now supported by FCC and how to get more bandwidth for all users.

Golden then met with staffers for the Senate Homeland Security and Government Affairs as well the Senate Intelligence Committees. They are very concerned about security in the cloud. Federal Information Security Management Act (FISMA) certification at the application level may not work well in the cloud. He thinks cybercrime can be fought with transparency.

Golden visited the Government Accountability Office (GAO) and Government Services Administration (GSA). The GSA has an approved list that you want to get on if you want to sell software to the government. They now have App.gov, an approved cloud computing offering so all government agencies can get on demand cloud services functionality. For example, the Department of Interior can use a credit card to use Salesforce.com. Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) is available now and soon Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS). The bidding process is complex but Golden expects lots of demand.

Department of Defense is rolling out Rapid Access Computing Environment (RACE) as an internal cloud for agile computing. They see it as a faster and cheaper alternative to traditional purchasing of computing services.

Joshua McKenty told of his work as Technical Architect on Nebula Project, a Cloud Computing pilot under development at NASA Ames Research Center. He designed the service capabilities in the platform ensuring robustness, scalability, and cost-effectiveness. Nebula integrates a set of open-source components into a seamless, self-service platform. It provides high-capacity computing, storage and network connectivity.  It uses a virtualized, scalable approach to achieve cost and energy efficiencies. The fully integrated Nebula components provide rapid development of policy-compliant and secure web applications. It encourages code reuse, improves coherence and cohesiveness of NASA’s collaborative web applications. Nebula will offer cost-effective Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS), Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) and Software-as-a-Service (SaaS). As a hybrid cloud, external researchers will have consistent tool sets and high-speed data connections to collaborate with NASA.

10-27-09McKentyWeberChoi copy10-27-09EhretKapadiaStehle copy

Copyright 2009 DJ Cline All rights reserved.