Tag Archives: Mike Dauber of Battery Ventures

Mar. 15, 2012 SVForum Big Data Analytics

Kieth Gatto see below.

Mar. 15, 2012 SVForum Big Data Analytics

On Thursday, March 15, 2012 in Mountain View at the Microsoft Conference Center, SVForum held the “Big Data Analytics Conference – 2012 and Beyond.” Big data keeps getting bigger. Like the ocean, there is a lot of water but it has to be filtered before you can use any of it. The revolution in faster analytics offers the hope of turning big data in to useful information and timely reaction for the public and private sector. Gathering and analyzing big data still raises concerns about privacy and must be considered in the rush to be more efficient.

Bruno Aziza of Microsoft delivered the opening keynote “Data Doesn’t Matter Until…”

Joe Jasin of DNA Partners moderated panelists Lucian Masalar of Jiff, Kim Morgan of Motorola Mobility and Mario Tapia of Getjar on big data and mobile.

Anjul Bhambhri of IBM delivered the second keynote on “Smarter Decision Making – Leveraging Big Data to Gain New Actionable Insights.”

Rob Craft of Microsoft moderated panelists Lenin Gali of Ubisoft, Jeffrey Krone of Zettaset, Yuvaraj Athur Raghuvir of SAP and Rohit Valia of IBM on big data and the business enterprise.

Marco Smit of Health 2.0 Advisors moderated panelists Jishnu Bhattacharjee of Nexus Venture Partners, Mike Dauber of Battery Ventures, Lars Leckie of Hummer Winblad and Andy Vitus of Scale Venture Partners on big data and investment landscape.

Michael Driscoll of Metamarkets moderated panelists Amr Awadallah of Cloudera, Todd Papaioannou of Continuuity and Ben Werther of  Platfora talked about big data beyond Hadoop.

Dr. DJ Patil of Greylock delivered the closing keynote “Data Jujitsu – The art of turning data into product.”

Donna Lea Downs Kawasaki AKA Donna Kawasaki attended this event.

Keith Gatto also attended this event. He can be seen here.

Note:

Remember when Berkeley was all about free speech? Remember when journalists could report on an event open to the public and say who was there? What if they were government employees funded by taxpayers? Would they have a right to know? Remember the First Amendment?

Attendees consented when I asked them if I could take their picture. Not only that, attendees consented when they signed up for the event. Please read the following:

Event Photo and Video Policy

SVForum events are open to the public, and SVForum does not restrict attendees (including SVForum staff and volunteers) from taking photos or videos at our events. By attending our events, you acknowledge that you are in a public place, and that attendees (including SVForum volunteers) may capture your image in photos and videos. Nevertheless, SVForum encourages event attendees to exercise common sense and good judgment, and respect the wishes of other attendees who do not wish to be photographed at the Events.

SVForum uses photos and videos taken at its events for a variety of
purposes, including publication on the SVForum website. If you see any photos or profiles about yourself on the Site that you would like
removed, please contact us.

Photo/ Audio/ Video Release

As part of our mission to provide technologists and entrepreneurs with exposure to education, best practices and other information from leaders in their fields, speakers, panelists and audience members should be aware that we may record all, or part, of the events we organize, including comments from speakers, panelists and audience members.  The resulting raw and edited materials, including still photographs, video and audio recordings, and associated verbatim transcripts, may be used by SVForum, without restriction, in press releases, white papers, conference collateral, web sites and other publications.

Copyright 2013 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Copyright 2012 DJ Cline All rights reserved. That means you cannot use it without my permission. At this point that means even one word or picture. Haste and College? Dayton and Wiley?

Jul. 19, 2011 SVForum Lighting The Future

On July 19, 2011 in San Francisco at Nixon Peabody, SVForum held a Clean Tech Breakfast Series on “Clean Lighting Solutions: Lighting the Future.” How many panelists does it take to change a light bulb’s efficiency? Mavis L. Yee of Nixon Peabody moderated panelists Mike Dauber of Battery Ventures, Steve Goldberg of Venrock, Tony McGettigan of Luxim, Carl Schlachte of Ventiva and Victor Westerlind of Rockport Capital.

Commercial building lighting uses 71 percent of overall lighting electricity in the United States. The panel discussed the economic, political and technical issues challenging adoption.

Most consumers care about up front costs. They will not pay forty dollars for an LED if they can buy an incandescent for a dollar. Most businesses don’t care about the environmental aspect unless it can reduce their costs by half. Retail businesses understand the importance of good efficient lighting to help sell their products.

Not many are aware of the hidden cost of CFLs over LEDs, which is the amount of mercury that must be safely disposed when the unit is replaced. LEDs also have the advantage of being easier to tie in with sensor networks that can turn on as people walk around a building.

Energy efficiency policy impacts economic efficiency and growth. California’s energy saving policies changed the lighting industry so much that state uses the same amount of electricity it did twenty years ago and still had double digit economic growth. China is adopting similar policies as it deals with even greater economic growth. Of course, with all the new construction, it will not have to retrofit existing infrastructure as in the United States. Both countries will have to do more with less to light the way.

Copyright 2011 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Nov. 16, 2010 SDF Green Data Centers

On Tuesday November 16, 2010 in San Francisco at Nixon Peabody, SDForum held a Clean Tech Breakfast on “Greening Your Data Center.” Mavis Yee of Nixon Peabody moderated panelists Rick Chateauvert of EMC, Mike Dauber of Battery Ventures, Andrew Feldman of SeaMicro and Mukesh Khattar of Oracle.

All that data floating in the cloud is really stored in brick and mortar data centers around the world. These server farms currently use huge amounts of electricity generating waste heat. We are reaching the physical and engineering limits of current technology to cool these buildings. Incremental improvements are not enough. Companies must rethink everything from HVAC to the power consumed by the smallest semiconductor.

Ultimately the millions of mobile devices demanding all this data may provide a solution. The semiconductors, flash memory and power management software used by smart phones could dramatically the increase the efficiency of future data centers. There would be a great opportunity for someone to develop a data center app for that.

Copyright 2010 DJ Cline All rights reserved.