Tag Archives: Chris Yeh of PBWorks

May 9, 2012 SVForum Startup Up And Running

On Wednesday, May 9, 2012 in Palo Alto At Cooley LLP, SVForum presented “Main Event: Getting your Startup Up & Running in 2012.” Chris Minunni of Cooley moderated panelists Manish Chandra of Poshmark, Mary Curtis of Pacifico, Eric Johnson of Ignited USA and Chris Yeh of Pbworks. They discussed getting a startup the right foundation with business plans, legal agreements, staffing and of course funding. Think not only about how you get started but where you want to wind up.

Copyright 2012 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Oct. 15, 2010 SDF Open Innovation and the Ecosystem Conference

Oct. 15, 2010 in Palo Alto at HP, SDForum held the Open Innovation and the Ecosystem Conference. Experts shared how innovation works for large and small companies at the local and international level.

Anthony Wasserman, Carnegie Mellon Silicon Valley made the welcoming remarks. Ted Shelton of Open-First introduced opening keynote speaker Judy Estrin, CEO of Jlabs and author of “Closing the Innovation Gap”. She spoke of the need for sustainable innovation culture where people are comfortable taking risk. While everyone wants a breakthrough, most corporate innovation is incremental, meeting only existing customer expectations. Henry Ford said if he had given customers what they wanted, they would have gotten a faster horse. The challenge is to encourage orthogonal innovation, where an existing product is used in a new way. Apple did not invent the MP3 player, the cell phone or tablet, but it found an innovative way to use both with the iPod, iPhone and iPad.

Rich Friedrich, Director of Strategy and Innovation Office at HP Labs gave a company keynote on “Open Innovation at HP Labs.” Mobile sensors measuring our surroundings will transform the way we collect and use information in areas like weather, traffic or even bio-signs.

Ping Li of Accel Partners and Mike Olson of Cloudera had a fireside chat. Olson’s previous company was bought by Oracle and he wanted to do something different. He found it in the cloud. He thinks Hadoop and other tools will cause the biggest change since the introduction of the relational database thirty years ago. All of this data cannot be kept private if we want to use it effectively. We must penalize people who misuse it. An example would be insurance companies having access to medical records but they could not deny coverage based on it.

Deborah Magid, IBM Venture Group gave a keynote on “The Innovator’s Dilemma.” IBM made an early commitment to open source and Linux. They have a long track record of innovation and are investing in the cloud and mobile spaces.

Chris Yeh of PBWorks moderated panelists Christine Crandell of Accept Corporation, Riley Gibson of Napkin Labs, Guy Martin of CollabNet and Padmanabh Dabke of Spigit. The topic was “Innovation in Practice.” If you don’t have a research and development lab, start one. Promote risk and accept failure in a culture of cross discipline. Reward courage.

Doug Solomon of IDEO spoke of his five principles in “Building Innovation Tools that Work,” The challenge was to design a system to share knowledge effectively in an organization. IDEO developed an internal social media site that builds pointers to people and not just the data they produce. People need to be rewarded for participating. They should demand intuitive interfaces. They must take the road more traveled by finding the way most users are comfortable communicating. Learn from these steps and keep iterating early and often.

Pascal Finette, Director of Mozilla Labs gave his perspective on browser innovation.

Mike Cassidy of San Jose Mercury News moderated panelists Raj Apte of PARC, Denis Browne of SAP and John Wolpert, CEO of UpStart Mobile. The topic was “Silicon Valley Innovators: How They Do What They Do?” They look outside their own companies for new ideas and trends.

Henry Tirri of Nokia Research Center gave the closing keynote.

Copyright 2010 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Oct. 30, 2009 SDF Collaboration

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On October 30, 2009 at Techmart in Santa Clara, SDForum hosted “Collaboration 2.0: Collaborating in the Next Decade”. Using social media at work is collaboration. So many consumers are adopting and using social networking and web applications at home that it is starting to find its way into the workplace. Companies incorporate these new tools to improve productivity and combine disparate resources around the globe. They create content and build engaging communities. Online collaboration not only augments old ways of doing things, it improves mindshare, transparency, and creates a sense of community among coworkers. It adds value for customers and opportunities for new investment.

James Lundy of Gartner Research gave the opening keynote. He said the traditional IT structure is vulnerable and the users are out of control. It is the Wild West all over again.

Harold Yu of Orrick moderated panelists Salim Ali of SAP, Roosevelt Bynum of IBM, Chuck Ganapathi of Salesforce.com, Didier Moretti of Cisco Systems, Perry Teevens of Skype and Matt Thompson of Microsoft. They talked about “The Incumbent Perspective on Collaboration”. Big corporations are not only collaborating internally, they see it as they way to find and keep customers. Legacy IT systems must give way for the Facebook generation. If the IT department doesn’t keep up, employees and customers will bypass it.

Danny Wallace of PricewaterhouseCoopers held a fireside chat on “Use Case Study – Real Time Collaboration – End User Customer Perspective” with Prashant Nema of SVB Financial Group and Mark Plakias of Orange Labs. Unstructured collaboration allows free-flowing ideas between multiple parties. Plakias thinks of online collaboration as a low-cost, low-threshold way to round up research inputs.

Frank Marino of Frank Rimerman Consulting moderated panelists Michael Ashley of FastPencil, Ivan Koon of YouSendIt, Ross Mayfield of Socialtext and Aaron Levie of Box.net. They discussed “Emerging Talents that are Changing the Business Model – What’s the Next Big Thing?” When collaboration and technology create value, the money and talent follow. The average employee spends twenty percent of their week looking for information. Collaboration is dirty, until you allow people to argue, break rules, and mess things up, you won’t get innovation.

Anthony Ha of Venture Beat moderated venture capitalists Asheem Chandna of Greylock and Sharon Wienbar of Scale Venture Partners. They discussed “A Look at the Investment Landscape” You must get new customers within a certain period. This is a metric used to evaluate startups. Investors are looking for broad adoption even if the deal size is small. The “try before buy” model means software has to deliver quickly. Everyone is trying to figure out how to become the Twitter or Facebook for the enterprise when it will probably be Twitter and Facebook.

Chris Yeh of PBWorks moderated panelists Kailash Ambwani of FaceTime, Margaret Francis of Scout Labs, Ryan Holmes of HootSuite, Nanda Kishore of ShareThis and Seth Sternberg of Meebo. They discussed “Social Collaboration and the Consumer”. Collaboration is about people not technology. If you want to learn about collaboration start using the tools. Consumers will break down barriers to get what they want. You want to be there with a solution when it happens. Eighty percent of Generation Y use social networking for both business and personal use already. Privacy and security are big concerns. Social media is not like Vegas, what happens on Facebook, doesn’t actually stay on Facebook. Chris Yeh said a collaboration tool only works if it helps people do more and not get in the way.

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Copyright 2009 DJ Cline All rights reserved.